Cool Natural Cures images

A few nice natural cures images I found:

Natural Mineral Baths – The Crescent, Buxton – bronze plaque
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Image by ell brown
The Crescent and The Slopes in Buxton, Derbyshire. Location of the famous spa baths of the town!

Natural Mineral Baths

The Natural Baths, on the site of the original Roman Bath, was built between 1851 and 1854 and will form the centre piece of the Spa Pool and treatment rooms of the hotel.

Grade II listed.

Natural Mineral Baths, Buxton

BUXTON

SK0573NE THE CRESCENT
616-1/3/76 (South West side)
25/01/51 Natural Mineral Baths

GV II

Natural mineral baths, now tourist information centre.
1851-53, altered 1923-24. By Henry Currey. Ashlar gritstone
with ashlar dressings and Welsh slate and part glazed roof.
EXTERIOR: single storey. Street front, 5 windows arranged
1:3:1. Projecting central section has rusticated pilasters and
between set back rusticated round arches topped with
entablature and parapet inscribed NATURAL MINERAL BATHS.
Central round headed doorway with double panel doors and
fanlight, flanked by single round headed windows. Set back
wings have pilasters and between set back rusticated round
arches topped with entablature and balustrade, each has a
single round headed window. All windows have early C20
glazing.
INTERIOR: retains original layout. The entrance leads into
foyer, to right central hall with stained glass roof light and
rooms radiating off. To left of entrance access to source of
the spa water. Also from foyer is access to tiled corridor
with 2 baths leading off, male and female, both tiled and the
latter bath rounded to end with 7 cast-iron columns with
guilloche railing acting as supports to glazed skylight above.
Changing rooms, one a communal room with wooden partitions and
3 small sunken individual baths are served by a pair of
cubicles to each. A doorway, now blocked, once connected with
the Old Hall.
(The Buildings of England: Pevsner N: Derbyshire:
Harmondsworth: 1953-1986: 116; The Derbyshire Heritage series:
Bower A: The Water Cure: Derby. Hall and Sons: 1985-: 12).

Listing NGR: SK0575673501

This text is a legacy record and has not been updated since the building was originally listed. Details of the building may have changed in the intervening time. You should not rely on this listing as an accurate description of the building.

Source: English Heritage

Listed building text is © Crown Copyright. Reproduced under licence.

bronze plaque

Image from page 416 of “Thus shalt thou live : hints and advice for the healthy and the sick on a simple and rational mode of life and a natural method of cure” (1894)
natural cures
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: thusshaltthouliv00knei
Title: Thus shalt thou live : hints and advice for the healthy and the sick on a simple and rational mode of life and a natural method of cure
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: Kneipp, Sebastian, 1821-1897
Subjects: Hydrotherapy Health Naturopathy Hygiene Hydrotherapy
Publisher: Kempten (Bavaria) : Jos. Koesel
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Text Appearing Before Image:
oup. Debility. Decline.Delirium tremens. Diarrhoea. Diphtheria. Dropsy. Dysentery. Ears,<3iseases of the. Ears, humming in the. Epilepsy. Eruptions. Erysipelas.Eyes, cataract of the. Eyes, catarrh of the. Fever. Giddiness. Gout.Hemorrhoids (Piles). Head complaints. Heart complaints. Hoarseness.Hypochondriasis. Inflammation. Influenza. Insanity. Itch. Jaundice.Kidney complaints. Knee, tumour ©n the. Lumbago. Lungs, complaintof the. Lungs, emphysema of the. Lungs, inflammation of the. Megrim(Migraine). Melancholy. Mucous Fever. Nervous complaint. Nervousdisorder. Nervous exhaustion. Nervous headache. Nervous over-excite-ment. Perspiration. Pheumatism. Pupture. Saint Vituss dance. ScarletFever. Sciatica. Sleeplessness. Smali-pox. Spine, complaints of the.Stomach, acidity of the. Stomach complaints. Stomach cramp. Stomachl^mours. Stone. Tetters. Throat complaints of the. Typhus. Ulcers. Urinarydifficulties. Vaccination, bad efiects of. Voice, loss of the. Worms. —Alphabetical Index.

Text Appearing After Image:
PLANT-ATLAS illustrating FATHER KNEIPPs describing andpicturing most accurately all Medicinal Plantsmentioned books, with addition of several othersfrequently resorted to by (country) people. In order to comply with many wishes the Editor deter-mined upon publishing a minute pictorial representation togetherwith an elucidating description of all those Medicinal Plantsthat are mentioned in Eev. Seb. Kneipps Books. The Plant-Atlas, now complete, is carrying out that plan. Anyone isenabled by simply consulting the Plant-Atlas to find out him-self whatever herb he will look for in woods or fields an thusto make up; i a most pleasant way that Family-Medicine-Chest^l^, recommended by Kneipp. The Plant-Atlas is of the same Size as Rev. KneippsBooks and has been published in two Editions illustrated byPhototypes, either with plain or Coloured Plates. a) Edition I containing 41 Plates; generally only onePlant on one Page. Coloured Phototypes, true to Nature. Price, Cloth: 12 s, 6 d. Edition

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 50 of “Medical adviser & marriage guide : representing all the diseases of the genital organs of the male and female” (1864)
natural cures
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: 60511650R.nlm.nih.gov
Title: Medical adviser & marriage guide : representing all the diseases of the genital organs of the male and female
Year: 1864 (1860s)
Authors: Larmont, M. (Martin)
Subjects: Marriage Genital Diseases, Male Genital Diseases, Female
Publisher: New York : Warner
Contributing Library: U.S. National Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons, U.S. National Library of Medicine

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Text Appearing Before Image:
d absorbents,and in the lower the spongy body surrounding theurethra. The convex conical surface of the glandis covered by a fine membrane, in color resemblingthe red part of the lips. At its base, or corners,there are rows of projecting papillar, which secretea sebaceous matter, having a peculiar smell. Thegland, which possesses exquisite sensibility, is pro-tected by the loose covering called the prepuceor foreskin, which is tied to the penis, immediatelybelow the orifice of the urethra, by the band calledfraenum : this limits the motion of the prepuce, andtends to keep it in its proper place. The spongy substance of the urethra, whichforms the glans penis, is covered externally with anexceeding thin membrane or cuticle, under whichare placed the very sensible nervous papillae, whichare the chief seat and cause of pleasure and pain inthis part. We may now understand why many, inthe venereal act, have not the glans distended,though the whole penis is at the same time turgki, PLATE 6.

Text Appearing After Image:
THE GENERATIVE ORGANS. 49 because the glans belong entirely to the cavernousbody of the urethra ; and if that body be paralyticor weakened from any preceding or existing cause,which we have often known to proceed from un-natural practices ; in all those people where thespongy body of the urethra is not distended, impo-tence will arise, which, if not perfectly understood,caunot be cured by any physician; whereas, inhealthy men, wheu these organs are in due toneduring the orgasmus veneris, or the moment beforethe semen is ejected, the glans and whole cavernousbody of the urethra are extremely turgid, so as tobe ready to burst; but soon after, a kind of con-vulsive motiou follows, and the semen is dischargedwith a slight loss of strength for a little timethroughout the whole body, which soon recovers itsusual vigor. During coition, the corpus spongiosum and glanspenis are rendered turgid by the blood filling theirvascular structure, and the whole of the urethra islengthened, but made nar

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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