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Image from page 194 of “Character sketches of romance, fiction and the drama” (1892)
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Identifier: charactersketche00inbrew
Title: Character sketches of romance, fiction and the drama
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: Brewer, Ebenezer Cobham
Subjects: Literature Allusions Fiction.
Publisher: New York,: E. Hess
Contributing Library: University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundation

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niadaughter of Titus Andronicus (properlyAndronicus). He is stabbed by Demetriusand Chiron, sons of Tamora queen of the The Death of Baudin J-P- Laurens, Artist F. MeauUe, Engraver ~rEFORE being a Republican, Baudin had been a tutor. He camem J from an intelligent and brave race of schoolmasters, ever perse-cuted, who have fallen from the Guiot Law into the Falloux Law,and from the Falloux Law into the Dupanloup Law. The crime of theschoolmaster is to hold a book open; that suffices; the Church condemns him.There is now, in France, in each village, a lighted torch—the schoolmaster,and a mouth which blows upon it—the cure. The schoolmasters of France,who know how to die of hunger for Truth and Science, were worthy that oneof their race should be killed for Liberty. Baudin was killed. He had remained standing in his position on the omnibus (in the barri-cade). Three balls reached him. One struck him in the right eye andpenetrated into the brain. He fell. Hugos History of a Crime. i

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THE DEATH OF BAUDIN. BASSIANUS 105 BATTAE Goths.—(?) Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus(1593). Bassino {Count), the perjured hus-band of Aureha, slain by Alonzo.—Mrs.Centlivre, The Perjured Husband (1700). Bastard. Homer was probably a bas-tard. Virgil was certainly one. Neoptol-emos was the bastard son of Achilles byDeidamla (5 syL). Romulus and Remus,if they ever existed, were the love-sons ofa vestal. Brutus the regicide was a bas-tard. Ulysses was probably so, Teucercertainly, and Darius gloried in the sur-name of Notlios. Bastard {The), in English history is Will-iam I., natural son of Robert le Diable.His mother was a peasant girl of Falaise. Bastard of Oil^aiis, Jean Duuois, anatural son of Louis due dOrleans (brotherof Charles VI.), and one of the most brill-iant soldiers France ever produced (1103-1468). Beranger mentions him in hisCharles Sept. Bat {Dr.), naturalist in Coopers Prairie,who mistakes his faithful ass at night for amonster described in his note-book as Ves-pertil

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Image from page 386 of “The boy travellers in Australasia : adventures of two youths in a journey to the Sandwich, Marquesas, Society, Samoan and Feejee islands, and through the colonies of New Zealand, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, and
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Identifier: boytravellersina00knox
Title: The boy travellers in Australasia : adventures of two youths in a journey to the Sandwich, Marquesas, Society, Samoan and Feejee islands, and through the colonies of New Zealand, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, and South Australia
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Knox, Thomas Wallace, 1835-1896 Harper & Brothers. pbl
Subjects: Voyages and travels Adventure and adventurers Tutors and tutoring Friendship Sailing Sailors Animals Natural history
Publisher: New York : Harper & Brothers
Contributing Library: School of Theology, Boston University
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston University

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deadly serpents in Australia—the black snake, thebrown snake, the tiger snake, the diamond snake, and the death-adder.The black and brown are most common, and the brown snake frequent-ly reaches a length of nine feet. The most vicious and dangerous is thetiger snake, which seems to be allied to the cobra-de-capello of India, as, UNDERWOODS CURE FOR SNAKE-BITES. 36: when irritated, it flattens and extends its neck to twice its ordinary-size. It secretes its maximum amount of poison in the summer, and itsbite is speedily fatal. The bite of any of the snakes here enumeratedwill cause death in a few hours unless the proper antidotes are ap-plied, The death-adder is unhke the other snakes in one respect; it neverattempts to get out of any ones way, but lies quite still until it istouched, when it instantly strikes at its victim. The best-known rem-edies for snake-bites are hypodermic injections of ammonia, cutting outthe wound, and swallowing large quantities of brandy or other spirits.

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CAMPING-OUT ON A tATIXE-KLN. Mr. Watson says there was once a man named Underwood, whodiscovered a perfectly efficacious antidote to the bite of a poisonoussnake. He gave several performances in which he allowed himself tobe bitten by snakes that were undoubtedly healthy and in full posses-sion of their venomous powers. Dogs and rabbits that were bitten bythe same snakes after they had tried their fangs on Underwood diedverv soon afterwards: and it must be remembered that the second bite 3G4 THE BOY TRAVELLEKS IN AUSTRALASIA. of a snake is always less poisonous than the first. After being bittenby the snakes, Underwood applied a remedy which was known only tohimself, and soon recovered from the effects of the bite. The manner of his death is a very convincing proof of the perfec-tion of his remedy. One day, while under the influence of liquor, heallowed himself to be bitten by a snake; in consequence of his intoxi-cation he was unable to find his antidote, and so he died of the bite.H

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