Image from page 142 of “Through the heart of Patagonia” (1902)

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Image from page 142 of “Through the heart of Patagonia” (1902)
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Identifier: throughheartofpa00pricrich
Title: Through the heart of Patagonia
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Prichard, Hesketh Vernon Hesketh, 1876-1922 Woodward, Arthur Smith, 1864-1944 Thomas, Oldfield, 1858- Millais, John Guille, 1865-1931 Moreno, Francisco Pascasio, 1852-1919 Rendle, A. B. (Alfred Barton), 1865-1938 Britten, James, 1846-1924
Subjects: Natural history — Patagonia (Argentina and Chile) Patagonia (Argentina and Chile) — Description and travel
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton and company
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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the wanderings of the herdsthrougfh the chant^inof seasons. But the flesh of the ostrich ismore palatable, and is, consequently, preferred when it can be pro-cured. They drink mate in large quantities, which, as has beenshown, is the universal habit on the pampas, where it is, in fact,indispensable, supplying, as it does, to a certain extent, the placeof vegetables, besides having the valuable quality of refreshingand invigorating in a quite extraordinary degree. They rarely smoke pure tobacco ; it is too precious. Theymix it with about 80 per cent, of califate-wood shavings. Once,when short of tobacco, I tried their mixture, and in truth there aremany worse smokes upon the English and American markets.The califate is certainly a little acrid, but burns with a very bluesmoke. I fancy one could get on tolerably well with this fakedtobacco, aided by a bit of imagination and a strong throat. For the most part the tribes use stone pipes of a very singular ■•• Nansens Esquimaux Life.

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TEIRELCHE MATRONS

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Image from page 105 of “A description of the western resorts for health and pleasure reached via Union Pacific system, “the overland route.”” (1890)
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Identifier: descriptionofwes02unio
Title: A description of the western resorts for health and pleasure reached via Union Pacific system, "the overland route."
Year: 1890 (1890s)
Authors: Union Pacific railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago, Rand, McNally & co., printers
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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east of the railway station. Thesesprings impart a red hue to the surrounding soil. Their temperature is so highthat the hand can not be held in the water without great pain. The water isconducted into the hotel from the springs in wooden pipes for private bathingand for the great open bath, when it becomes cool enough for use. Thesesprings are patronized all the year round, and are very efificacious in curingrheumatism, neuralgia, catarrh, and all skin, blood, and kidney diseases. Thewaters are intensely hot, and their chief constituents are iron, magnesia, soda,and salt. The bracing air of the Wahsatch Range, mingling with the saline breezes ofthe Great Salt Lake, with the pure water of these thermal, balsamic springs,nowhere excelled for drinking or bathing purposes, produce a natural combina-tion of marvelously curative properties. The flow is about 156,000 gallons of water every twenty-four hours, at atemperature of 131° Fahrenheit. A close analysis of the water by Prof. Spencer

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i98) FOR HEALTH AND PLEASURE. 99 Fo Baird, of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C, shows that besidescontaining carbonate of iron in heavy deposits, it also contains: Grains tothe gallon. Silica 2.687 Alumina 0.234 Calcium sulphate. 18.074 Calcium chloride 170.498 Potassium chloride 97.741 Sodium chloride 1,052.475 Magnesium chloride 1.067 Magnesium carbonate 11.779 The bathing accommodations consist of a number of private tubs, for vaporor steam, and hot mud baths. The latter is the great Indian cure for rheuma-tism. Besides supplying these baths, this wonderful water is run into an outsidesummer bath i66 x 204 feet, three feet deep at the upper, and seven at the lower,side, arranged with foot-runs and spring-boards, thus affording amusement forhundreds at a time. WILLARD CANON AND FALLSAre reached via the Union Pacific to Ogden, and thence via the Utah &Northern Branch of the Union Pacific to Willard Station, where a good teamcan be had for the falls. The distance from

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Image from page 263 of “Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society” (1886)
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Identifier: journalofbombayn221913bomb
Title: Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society
Year: 1886 (1880s)
Authors: Bombay Natural History Society
Subjects: Natural history
Publisher: Bombay, Bombay Natural History Society
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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ff, but the eagle, after running and flapping along the ground,soared into the air and showed that it was (juite unhurt. What the end ofthis unnsual combat would have been had no one appeared on the scene ishard to say. But the odds seemed in favour of jackal. The eagle, Avhichmust have been surprised and rushed by the jackal before it could taketo flight, was obviously pinned to its ground by the superior mobility of itsassailant. For, if for an instant it had abandoned facing its adversary,which it would necessarily have had to do in order to get on the wing,its seizure and discomfiture were a quick certainly. In all probaToility the 190 JOURNAL, BOMBAY NATURAL HIST. SOCIETY, Vol. XXII. jackal, who, in addition, had all the advantages of the offensive, wouldby the rapidity of its movements have eventually exhausted its opponentand obtained the opening it so hungrily sought. H. A. F. MAGRATH, Lieut.-Col.KoHAT, December 1912. No. v.—TSAING (BIBOS SONDAICUS) FOUND WITHVILLAGE CATTLE.

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The Tsaing will be noticed above with a smaU white cross above, the fourthanimal from the left. With reference to Mr. Hauxwells letter, dated 26th February 1912,about a Tsaing found with village cattle, page 1072 of Vol. XXI, I herewithsend you a photograph which I took after Mr. Hauxwell left Bammauk.This time the animal allowed me to get up to within 70 feet of him. Heis absolutely harmless, and often sleeps quite near the village. He hasbeen known even to have slept within the village fence. On one occasion,when he was paying marked attention to a particular cow, the owner, tokeep him off, built a fence round his pen. The Tsaing was not to bedaunted. He cleared the fence and got in. On another occasion, anaggressive village bull attempted to make a stand against the Tsaing, butone heave was sufficient to convince the foolish bull that he was no matchto the Tsaing. The belief in the village is that this Tsaing is the re-incarnation of aPhongyi (Buddhist priest) who used to cure peop

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